July RV News Roundup

The Tallest Trees on the Planet Live at Redwood National Park

With no end in sight to the dangerous hot weather, you might be looking for a cooler RV destination. Redwood National and State Parks—reknowned for giant coast redwoods—is waiting for you.

This park is a whole package deal, with prairies, oak forests, riverways, and a breathtaking coastline that will leave you speechless. And the wildlife? Look out for Steller’s sea lions, Roosevelt elk, killer whales, and more.

Year-round temperatures average mid-40s to low-60s°F. Trees that reach for the sky, cooler weather and no reservations or entrance fees required (unless you camp). Head west!

Learn more about Redwood National and State Parks here.

 

Indulge in a Seafood Extravaganza at the Maine Lobster Festival

Craving a lobster roll? Maybe you’re more of a lobster stuffed into mac and cheese or a lobster donut kind of person. Whatever it is, you’ll find it at the Maine Lobster Festival. 

If your culinary tastes go beyond lobster, try the locally grown corn on the cob, homemade Maine blueberry cobbler, a variety of seafood chowders, and Maine steamed mussels or clams. 

There’s something for everyone at this epic event. Food, music, arts and crafts, a lobster cook-off with a cash prize, and the International Great Crate Race. 

The Maine Lobster Festival takes place August 2-6, 2023.

Check out the details here.

Outdoor RV Lighting: Yay or Nay?

Remember the long-running marketing campaign for a popular budget motel chain? Campgrounds don’t usually promise to leave a light on, so bring a flashlight if you pull in after hours.

Once you’re set up, you can use outdoor lights to brighten up your site. Lights  help with campsite security and safety. They discourage prowlers of both the human and animal kind, and help prevent trip-and-fall accidents.

Not everyone loves the light! Some campers feel like leaving your RV lit up all night is rude. It depends whether they identify as the party people or the “absolutely not” crew. 

Before you go all out with the lights, explore ways to use outdoor lighting without disturbing fellow campers.

 

The HD Living Vehicle

Family-owned Living Vehicle, based in Santa Barbara, California, specializes in off-grid-ready travel trailers. In 2024, they’ll introduce their latest luxury travel trailer—The HD Living Vehicle. It’s designed for the ultimate off-grid RV experience. 

Features of the HD Pro model include 72kWh of battery storage and 18kW of power. When you expand the solar awnings, the trailer has 4.4kW of solar power. Enough to power the trailer using 100% solar energy for several days.

Have you ever created potable water from humidity? Living Vehicle is the only trailer to use Watergen. It’s an optional feature and extracts up to 5 gallons of water from the air every 24 hours.

Take the virtual tour here

 

Do You Need to Filter Campground Drinking Water?

Before you take a sip from the campground water spigot think about this: where did it come from? If you’re not 100% certain, it’s a smart move to purify your drinking water. 

Purifying helps remove or kill harmful bacteria, viruses, parasites, and other contaminants sometimes present in water. It could mean the difference between enjoying your vacation or finding the closest urgent care facility.

Water filtering options for RVs include inline filters, countertop filters, and whole-house filtration systems. 

Help prevent water-borne illnesses by following these tips from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

 

In the News: Tips to Avoid Heatstroke

When you body becomes overwhelmed by high temperatures, you can suffer from heat stroke. It’s a serious condition and requires immediate medical attention.

You can avoid heat-related health problems by following these tips:

  • Stay hydrated
  • Avoid caffeine and alcohol
  • Wear loose-fitting, light-colored clothing 
  • Seek shade or air conditioning 
  • Limit outdoor activities during peak heat hours 
  • Wear a wide-brimmed hat and sunglasses
  • Place a wet a bandana or towel on your neck or forehead
  • Take cool showers or baths
  • Place cold packs on pulse points.

 

With the current heatwave blanketing the U.S., don’t leave home unprepared to beat the heat. Learn more about heat stroke here.

 

To learn more about any and all of these stories, check out the links in our show notes. 

You can connect with us each month as we bring a monthly roundup of news about RV life. We’ll highlight new RVs, tech that makes your travels better, all of the happenings in the outdoors space, and of course, some of the best farms, wineries, breweries, and more around North America. 

In the meantime, you can stay in touch with your Harvest Hosts team through our chat system at HarvestHosts.com.

 

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