6 Tips for Working from the Road

Many RVers across the country travel full-time while also working from their RV as well. Remote work has gotten even more popular and become an increasingly promising option for more folks during the pandemic, but there are also many whose jobs have always been remote. Working remotely from your RV comes with its own set of challenges. Here, Harvest Hosts has compiled the best six tips for working from the road. Whether you’re brand new to working in your RV or a seasoned professional, these tips can be helpful to help you get set up in your rig or even to offer a new perspective or bit of advice.

One consideration that we don’t cover in this article is the need for cell service and reception. We have covered the topic of obtaining Internet on the road previously, so be sure to check that out if you have any questions about getting yours set up.

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Set up a Dedicated Workspace

Just like with working from home, it’s important to have a dedicated workspace or office when working from your RV. Many folks choose to travel in an RV because of the minimalistic opportunities it offers, but, when living and traveling in the same small space, it’s still important to have a specific place that you regularly work from, whether that’s a corner of the bedroom, the dinette, dashboard, or even an outdoor workspace. It can be so tempting to work from bed or your couch, but having an official “office” can be helpful to get into your workflow, reduce distractions, and look a lot more professional during meetings. If you’re interested in learning more about ensuring that you have internet on the road, check out our helpful article about it. 

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Plan Your Travel Days

If you’re traveling full-time while working from the road, travel days can definitely present some challenges. It’s important to plan and schedule your travel days in a way that keeps them from interfering with your work day. After all, having managers email you about projects or having clients trying to reach you can be so stressful when you are packing up your RV or driving. If you’re able to, block off your calendar from any potential meetings on the day that you plan to travel so that there aren’t any last-minute surprises.

It can also be helpful to look at your schedule and choose to move on a lighter work day or on a day off. Of course, you can choose to pack up and move after your work day, but many campgrounds and Harvest Hosts locations prefer you check-in earlier in the day. Dedicated travel on days that you are free from work-related activities can be so much less stressful and more relaxing.

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Switch up Your Scenery

Working remotely in the same place every day can get boring. It can be helpful to switch up your scenery by working outside. Some stationary RVers have added an outdoor room to add more space and also give themselves a different place to work. Be sure you have a mobile hotspot to take with you outside so that you still have internet access. Some remote workers also enjoy switching up their scenery by heading to a local coffee shop. These locations typically offer free WiFi for customers. Working in a new space can inspire creativity and even increase your motivation, allowing you to accomplish more in a new environment.

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Have a Routine

This is one of the most important steps on this list. Having a routine and sticking with it can be the key to working from home or on the road. It’s incredibly important to not treat working on the road like a vacation. Be sure to wake up at a similar time during your work week and start work at a similar time. This will help you to complete your work in a timely manner and also to ensure that you are available for your team. Even if you’re a freelancer, a routine can ensure you remain productive and complete your work with plenty of time leftover to enjoy the rest of your day. 

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Take Your Breaks and Vacation Days

When working in an office, there are typically several cues to take your breaks. It could be a co-worker inviting you to go to lunch, the urge to to stretch your legs, or many other reminders or cues. Many of these same cues and reminders are lost while working remotely. However, it is still important to schedule yourself a lunch break and other smaller breaks to ensure your needs are still met. Similarly, it is important to still use your vacation days, even if RVing already feels like a vacation. Consider using a vacation day to take the day off and spend all day exploring, or consider taking a longer weekend to go camping in a remote national park. Either way, it is incredibly important to take these necessary breaks from work. Remember not to check emails, take phone calls, or answer messages during these breaks and vacation days!

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Remember to Go Outside!

Lastly, remember to go outside. Consider eating your lunch outside or taking a fifteen minute break to walk your dog (and yourself). Some remote workers even physically leave their RV at the end of their work day to go to a dog park or explore a local area. This can be a great way to switch off your brain to leave work at home and enjoy your evening.

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Working from the road is such a unique experience. It can be fun at times and stressful at other times. Following these tips can definitely help to keep things more on the fun side. Things will happen, but if you can be transparent with your employer, then all should be well. After all, things happen in life whether you’re working remotely, from the road, or if you go to an office every day. Working from the road comes with its own set of challenges, but with plenty of prior planning and considerations, you can become a pro at it in no time!

Have you worked from the road? Do you currently work from the road? Do you have any other tips that we missed? Tell us all about it in the comments below!

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