Voyaging to Yellowstone Cellars and Winery

Harvest Hosts is a unique RV membership program with a large network of available hosts. So far, 4061+ locations have opened their hearts and their homes and/or businesses to members of the Harvest Hosts RVing community. Through this program, members receive overnight accommodations with no camping fees in peaceful and serene places across North America. In return, members must make a purchase to patronize the small business that hosts them. Of these Hosts, Yellowstone Cellars and Winery is particularly inviting. Here, you can learn all about this winery’s history, its operations today, its origins within the Harvest Hosts community, and what future visitors can expect to experience.

The History

For most of his career, Clint, the owner of Yellowstone Cellars and Winery, worked as an agricultural and business journalist, writing feature stories and doing editorial research on agriculture, economics and international trade in Montana. Meanwhile, he always kept his hand in the ranching business, raising a small herd of cattle raised on a leased ranch in central Montana.

However, after over thirty years of chasing cows, literally and figuratively, he took the plunge into another area of contemporary American agriculture, thus creating a winery enterprise. After learning about the art of winemaking from his brother and sister-in-law at their winery in Blaine, Washington, Clint opened Yellowstone Cellars and Winery in Billings, Montana in 2015. He has since felt like he truly found his calling.

The Business Today

Yellowstone Cellars is a “bookend” boutique winery, complete with a wine cellar, a tasting room and an event area. Here, visitors can enjoy samples of their releases and experience the art and science of premium wine making. The winery bottles selections of red and white grapes, grown and hand-picked in the Yakima Valley and Columbia Valley vineyards of Washington. All grapes are crushed, fermented, cellared, and bottled on-site in Billings, Montana.

Their tasting room is open daily for samples, glass pours, and bottles, as well as deli items and pizzas. They host live music and open mic nights at various times throughout each month. Guests can also attend a variety of additional events, such as a “wine crush” each year. They also offer a wine club and wine appreciation classes, all available in their winery or on their outdoor patio.

Joining Harvest Hosts

Yellowstone Cellars and Winery joined the Harvest Hosts program just about two months ago. They have since had quite a few guests stay and are booked most nights. Guests are invited to park overnight in their large parking lot, which many have described as being quite comfortable. They have a beautiful patio area located beside a nice grassy area, as well as an indoor tasting room with flatbreads, pizzas, and charcuterie boards. Several guests have mentioned Clint’s kindness and hospitality, with a few saying that it made their stay that much better. Currently they have two spaces available for RVs under twenty-nine feet in length. They ask that guests call and book at least seventy-two hours in advance.

Yellowstone Cellars is a unique little winery in Billings, Montana, perfectly showcasing the excellence of a Harvest Hosts experience. Be sure to stop by on the way to or from Yellowstone or when passing through Billings, Montana.

Have you visited Yellowstone Cellars and Winery? Have you ever been to Billings? Tell us all about it below!

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  1. Connie
    26th May, 2021

    Why isn’t Ten Spoon Winery in Missoula included in Montana wineries on this page about Montana wineries?

    1. Sam Leash
      15th June, 2021

      Hey Connie! Even though we love all of our fantastic hosts, we don’t always include every location on our round-ups and road trip lists/ There’s simply not always enough words to include everything. However, for this particular grouping, it looks like Ten Spoons was either a brand new location or was not yet a Harvest Hosts location at all at the time the article was written (last September). Hope this helps!